Drummed Out of the LAPD Name:The Golt Sisters (Teresa Lynn Golt & Lisa Louise Golt) Business Entities:Lipstick Bail Bonds Offices and Locations:Orange, Los Angeles, San Diego, Ventura, Santa Barbara, Fresno, Riverside, San Bernardino, and Kern counties Website:www.lipstickbailbonds.net

Like other bail bondsmen, Teresa Lynn Golt talks big about preserving “law and order.” The only problem? Golt and her sister Lisa Louise Golt were both charged with using their positions within the police department for their own financial gain.

The Golt sisters run Lipstick Bail Bonds, which tries to cover the ugliness of California’s broken money bail system with pink lipstick, pink pepper spray, and pink stun guns. 

The Golt sisters run Lipstick Bail Bonds, which tries to cover the ugliness of California’s broken money bail system with pink lipstick, pink pepper spray, and pink stun guns.

According to their website, it helps them “perform all of their duties in style.”

Innocent bystanders at an Arby’s restaurant in Huntington Beach likely weren’t impressed by the sisters’ “style” when they burst in, clad in all pink, and attempted to “arrest” a man in 2013. According to the Orange County Register, they pepper sprayed him and shot him with a stun gun and rubber bullets. 

Perhaps it was that same recklessness and disregard for the law that also got the Golts charged with felonies in 2000.

The Los Angeles Times reported that the sisters “issued bail without a license and illegally accessed confidential information from law enforcement computers.” In other words, they were accused of using their positions within the police department — and taxpayer resources — to operate an illegal business.

Bail bondsmen frequently misrepresent themselves as peace officers, even though they have no public safety function. On their website, the Golts tout their experience as Los Angeles Police Department officers. What they don’t mention is that Lisa was fired for pepper spraying someone while off duty and Teresa was one of two officers whose misconduct led to the death of an 81-year-old Korean immigrant and a lawsuit against the city. 

The Golt sisters are prolific social media users who utilize their platform to attack anyone advocating for changes to California’s broken money bail system, suggesting in at least one tweet that a Filipino-American Assemblymember should “go back to the Philippines.”

California’s money bail system enables the Golt sisters and countless other disreputable bail bondsmen to push far beyond the boundaries of the law. It’s little wonder that more Californians, including law enforcement voices like state Attorney General Xavier Becerra, are calling for reform of the state’s money bail system.